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Testicles Are Different Sizes - Is This Normal?

Published: 5 August, 2009
Dear TeenHealthFX,
I am 17 teen and i havae testicle problem. my problem is that my both testicles are of different size. Is this natural? or there is a problem?
Signed: Testicles Are Different Sizes - Is This Normal?

Dear Testicles Are Different Sizes - Is This Normal?,

 

You didn’t mention if there is a slight difference in size between your testicles or if they are significantly different in size. If there is just a slight difference, keep in mind that when it comes to body parts like feet, testicles, and breasts, it is very common for one to be a little bit bigger than the other (very often, but not always, it is the left side that is bigger). So if you are noticing just a minor variation, there is probably no need to worry. However, since FX cannot give any kind of definitive assessment over the internet, even if there is just a slight variation it is best that you be seen by a medical care professional so you can find out for sure if there is anything to be concerned about since this is worrying you.

 

Since healthy testicles are nearly identical in size, if there is a significant difference in size between your testicles, then you should definitely meet with a medical care professional. The following could be responsible for size difference:

 

·         Orchitis: Inflammation of a testicle due to mumps or a bacterial infection, leaving men with one small testicle.

·         Hydrocele: A benign (harmless) collection of fluid around a normal testicle.

·         Acute infections: Infections that can cause a testicle to enlarge, often accompanied by pain, swelling, redness, warmness, and tenderness of the area.

·         Testicular cancer: Cancer of the testicles that are often accompanied by a hard, non-tender lump or mass. This is the most serious possibility of what could cause significant differences in testicle size, however, it is also a condition that is highly curable when detected early enough.

·         Spermatic cyst: A benign (harmless) cyst which develops next to the epididymis, near the top of the testicle.

·         Epididymitis: An infection in the tubular coil that collects sperm from the testes. This infection often causes fever, swelling and pain in the top and back of the scrotum. The pain develops gradually over several hours or days and usually becomes severe.

·         Varicose veins: Causes painless swelling (the area can feel kind of like a bag of worms). Varicose veins aren’t harmful for your health, however, they can lead to infertility.

 

During an exam your doctor may perform some of the following tests:

·         Transillumination: This simple test can tell doctors when fluid is present versus some kind of solid mass as bright light will pass through fluid, not solid mass.

·         Ultrasound: This painless, safe test can detect lumps or hard masses in the testicular area to help the doctor determine the cause of the enlarged testicle. 

 

This is a good time for TFX to mention that it is important for males, particular males under the age of 35, to do routine testicular self-exams every month. Read our answer to Testicular Cancer to learn how to perform a testicular self-exam. During these self-exams keep an eye out for:

·         Swelling of the testicle

·         A firm pea-sized lump anywhere in the scrotum

·         Pain or dull aches anywhere around the testicles

 

If you see that there is a significant difference in testicle size, this difference in size has not always been like this, or you just want to know for sure what is going on, make an appointment with your primary care physician or an adolescent medicine specialist.

 

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-6475 for an appointment or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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