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Little Bumps On Penis & Scrotum

Published: 14 October 2010
Dear TeenHealthFX,
I have little bumps on the shaft of my penis and on my scrotum they sometimes have hair in the middle of the but the ones on the shaft don't. They also look like they have white puss in them but they won't pop and they are just normal skin color. I'm wondering what they are and how I can get rid of them. Btw it's impossible that they are the result of an STD
Signed: Little Bumps On Penis & Scrotum

Dear Little Bumps On Penis & Scrotum,

 

TeenHealthFX appreciates how common it is for adolescent males to become concerned about things that look “different” in the genital area. Sometimes these variants indicate that there is a medical problem present, but usually these variants are just normal differences that occur from person to person and are nothing to be worried about. FX has listed some possibilities below of what the bumps on your penis and scrotum could be, however, keep in mind that we cannot make any kind of accurate diagnosis over the web. If you feel concerned about these bumps, or would feel more at ease to know for certain what they are, then you should meet with a medical care professional who can examine the area and make an accurate diagnosis.

The bumps you are noticing are probably just normal hair follicles, but they could also be folliculitis, molluscum contagiosum, or pearly penile papules.

·         Normal hair follicles: Bumps in the genital area can be normal hair follicles, which can be present on the scrotum and lower penile shaft. These hair follicles are normal and harmless.   

·         Folliculitis: This condition occurs when hair follicles become infected, and appears as small, white-headed pimples around one or more hair follicles. Most cases of folliculitis are superficial, some may itch, and some cases may even be painful. Superficial folliculitis often clears on its own in a few days, but deep or recurring folliculitis may need medical treatment.

·         Molluscum contagiosum: A common viral infection of the skin that consists of firm papules that are usually painless and usually disappear within a year. This condition is spread through direct person-to-person contact and through contact with contaminated objects. Medical treatment is generally recommended because it does spread easily.

·         Pearly penile papules: This condition generally consists of skin colored papules (tiny bumps) located on the glans penis (the head of the penis); they do not appear on the shaft or scrotum. They are a normal variant of the skin, and they are not transmitted through sexual activity. 

Some of these conditions are sexually transmitted, but some are not – and all are considered to be fairly benign. Since you said it would be “impossible” for these bumps to be the result of an STD, FX is assuming you have never been sexually active. If you have never engaged in any kind of intimate sexual activity then it is true that you should not have any kind of STD. However, keep in mind that if you have participated in intimate sexual activity, it is possible that an STD was transmitted. Even if your partner told you he/she did not have any STDs, keep in mind that not everyone is honest about this information and that not everyone is aware that they have an STD because they could be carrying one without being symptomatic and then unknowingly pass it on.

Again, since there are several possibilities of what could be causing these bumps, and because TeenHealthFX cannot make any kind of accurate diagnosis over the web, FX recommends that you meet with your doctor for a consultation about this. A medical professional would need to look at these bumps in order to correctly determine what they are, as well as provide any necessary treatment. If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-6475 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

 

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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