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Do Guys Know When Their Pre-Cum Is About To Cum?

Published: December 21, 2007
Dear TeenHealthFX,
Me and my boyfriend started having unprotected sex and I was reading that a guy has pre cum before he actually comes. Well he says he knows when he is going to come so he does pull out before he comes, but I wanted to know do guys know when their pre-cum is about to come? Also I been feeling like I am going to throw up but it doesn't come out and I get side cramps. Is both of those sighs of pregnancy?
Signed: Do Guys Know When Their Pre-Cum Is About To Cum?

Dear Do Guys Know When Their Pre-Cum Is About To Cum?,

 

It is generally very hard for a man to know when pre-ejaculatory fluids (pre-cum) are about to be discharged. If a guy says he always knows when this is about to happen, most likely he is mistaken about his own abilities or he is saying whatever he needs to say to convince his partner that a condom isn’t necessary. And since there is a good chance that he will not know each and every time, what you need to think about is this – if you do get pregnant and you either have an abortion or have the baby, your body will have to go through all of that, not his. And is it really worth the risk in terms of what you might have to go through and deal with?

 

FX would also like to caution you that not using a condom puts you at risk for transmitting an STD. People are not always symptomatic when carrying an STD and therefore they might honestly believe they are free and clear of any STDs, and other people are unfortunately not honest about their sexual history with their partners – so it always a good idea to think in a preventative way and use a condom each and every time you are having oral, anal, or vaginal sex.

 

As far as being pregnant, if you have had unprotected sex, it is possible that you are pregnant. FX suggests that you speak to your primary care physician or an adolescent medicine specialist as soon as possible to determine whether or not you may be pregnant, and to discuss your options in the event that you are.

 

In the future, remember that it is always easier to prevent something problematic from happening than to deal with it once it has happened. Wearing a condom is an easy way to protect yourself from unwanted pregnancies and the transmission of STDs – finding out you are pregnant (when you don’t want to be) or that you have contracted an STD is a physically and emotionally difficult thing to have to deal with. And remember that if your partner is not interested in protecting you from having to deal with these kinds of issues in terms of wanting to practice safer sex, than you may need to think about how devoted he really is to you and your overall well-being.

 

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-6475 for an appointment or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact Girl’s Street – A Young Woman’s Health Program – at 908.522.2555.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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