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I'm on the Pill, But Could I Be Pregnant?

Published: March 22, 2017
Dear TeenHealthFX,
I'm on reclipsen birth control pills. i sometimes take them 2-3 hours late and do not use condoms with my partner. i'm current on the first day of my second week of active pills. i got my most recent period but missed the first pill of my pack afterwards and did not take it the next day. the night i missed i had unprotected sex twice. about three days ago i started feeling cramps in my lower abdomen as well as fatigue and nausea, but no vomiting. what are the chance i am pregnant?
Signed: I'm on the Pill, But Could I Be Pregnant?

Dear I'm on the Pill, But Could I Be Pregnant?,

Reclipsen birth control pills, like all oral contraceptives, need to be taken as directed in order to be as reliable as possible. This includes:

  • Using a second form of contraception, such as condoms, for the first 7 days of your first cycle of pills.
  • Taking the pill at the same time each day. Birth control pills work best when no more than 24 hours pass between doses.
  • Do not skip or delay taking your pill by more than 24 hours. If you miss a dose, you could get pregnant.

 

If you do not take your pills around the same time every day and have missed pills, then pregnancy is possible. If you have already missed your period, FX suggests that you take a pregnancy test or schedule an appointment with your primary care physician, gynecologist, or adolescent health care specialist. If you are concerned about cost or confidentiality issues you can always go to a Planned Parenthood health care center.

If you are pregnant, a medical health professional can help you to learn more about your pregnancy options.

If you are not pregnant, it is very important that you discuss with a healthcare professional what method of birth control is best for you. Doctors generally recommend that teens and young adults who are sexually active use condoms to protect against unwanted pregnancies and the transmission of STDs, as well as a back-up method of birth control such as the pill or birth control shot. If you are having trouble remembering to the take the pill, you can discuss other options, such as the birth control shot or IUD, which might work better for you.

It would be best to abstain from intercourse until you have a chance to speak to a doctor about all of this. But if you do choose to be sexually active, please use condoms each and every time you have sex to protect against the transmission of STDs and to protect against unwanted pregnancies in the event you are not pregnant.

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

FX also suggests that you check out the links in our Resource of the Month: Planned Parenthood Resources on Safer Sex so that you can learn about sexual readiness, how pregnancy happens, pregnancy tests, emergency contraception, birth control, STDs and more. The more educated you are about these topics, the more likely you will make healthy decisions for yourself when it comes to your sexual health.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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